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Archive for October, 2010

In the Northwoods of WI, wolves are becoming more common as their population increases. Just as in other parts of the country, wolves invoke lots of emotion. Conflicts with wolves are increasing.

Here are some tips from Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources website to help us live with wolves and reduce conflicts:

Wolves are shy and generally avoid humans. Most people will never see a wolf, let alone have a conflict with one. Wolves can, however, lose their fear of humans through habituation and may approach camping areas, homes or humans. When this happens, there is an increased possibility for conflict between wolves and humans.

While seeing a wolf is a memorable experience, like any other wild animal, you should use caution when they are close.

Below are guidelines that you can follow to decrease the chance of wolf habituation and conflict while living and visiting wolf country.

 

Living in wolf country Camping in wolf country

 

Watching wolves in wolf country
Do not feed wolves.  Cook, wash dishes and store food away from sleeping areas.  Keep the following in mind when viewing wolves close:
Feed all pets indoors; leave no food outdoors. Pack out or dispose of garbage and left over food properly. Do not feed wolves 
Dispose of all food and garbage in cans with secure lids. Suspend food, toiletries and garbage out of reach of any wildlife.   Do not entice wolves to come closer 
Do not feed wildlife: attracting any prey animal may attract wolves. Keep pets near you at all times.

 

Do not approach wolves 
Hang suet feeders at least 7 feet above the surface of the ground or snow.   Leave room for a wolf to escape. 
Don’t leave pets unattended outside: dogs and cats are easy targets for wolves    Do not allow a wolf to approach any closer than 300 feet 
If pets must be unattended in the yard, keep them in a kennel with a secure top

 

Aggressive or fearless wolves in wolf country:

If a wolf acts aggressively (growls or snarls) or fearlessly (approaches humans at a close distance without fear) take the following actions:

Raise your arms and wave them in the air to make yourself look larger.  

Back away slowly; do not turn your back on the wolf.  

Make noise and throw objects at the wolf.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reality of Wolf Attacks in North America

It is important to keep wolf attacks in perspective. There has been only one case of a healthy, wild wolf killing a person in North America in the last 100 years. Most wolves are not dangerous to humans and there is a greater chance of being killed by lightning, bee sting or car collision with a deer than being injured by a wolf. The injuries that have occurred were caused by a few wolves that became fearless of humans due to habituation. Nonetheless, like bears and cougars, wolves are instinctive predators that should be kept wild and respected.

Information from International Wolf Center, Ely, MN    http://www.wolf.org/wolves/index.asp

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